We fix
carbon

THINK BIG

Brilliant Planet was founded in 2013 and is funded by several of the world's leading climate technology investors. We are headquartered in London, with operations in Morocco and Oman.

We're a company with science and engineering at our core and following eight years of pioneering R&D and three years of pilot operations we are now progressing towards commercial-scale operations.

At Brilliant Planet you will meaningfully contribute to solving one of our planet's most pressing issues: climate change.

You'll own your role and have a lot on your plate, but you'll be part of a passionate team of diverse professionals that will support you along the way.

Leadership Team

experienced professionals with a passion for change

Our leadership team consists of experienced professionals who have operated at the top of their game across a broad range of sectors.

Whether you're an engineer, scientist, or business professional, there is ample opportunity to learn and grow by joining the Brilliant Planet team.

For more on the senior leadership team, refer to the bio's below.

Founder & Chief Scientist

Raffael Jovine

Raffael has worked with photosynthesis from under the ice in Antarctica to the hot deserts of Oman to create new algal growth methodologies.

Prior to Brilliant Planet, Raffael was a SVP at Clinerion, Switzerland a medical data service provider with a global health care organisation network and >400m patient records.  Before that he was an executive consultant at Capgemini and Booz & Co.  

Raffael completed his postdoctoral scholarship at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, his PhD at the University of California in Santa Barbara, and his BS at Yale University.  He contributes to multiple marine carbon working groups.

Chief operating officer

piers mudd

Piers is a seasoned entrepreneur and senior executive with an extensive background in founding and scaling businesses.

In his previous role as Founding CEO of Yalelo in East Africa, Piers led the company from start-up to an award-winning team of 500 staff in 3 years.

Prior to that Piers was President and Co-founder of NNP Capital Partners building and running a diversified portfolio of facilities in the infrastructure and energy sector in the Caribbean region. He began his career as an officer in the British Army, serving on operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.  

Piers holds a BSc from Bristol University, an MLitt from St Andrews University and has also studied at INSEAD and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

engineering director

mert yesugey

Mert is a passionate and driven leader with extensive experience in the construction industry, delivering innovative and sustainable solutions for complex challenges. Prior to Brilliant Planet, Mert was a Divisional Director at Mott MacDonald (18,000-person engineering consultancy) where he led teams with specialist skills ranging from civil and structural engineering to information management and data science.

Throughout his career, Mert has been involved with the design and delivery of multibillion large-scale infrastructure projects globally, such as Dubai Metro, Doha Metro, Thames Tideway Tunnel, Heathrow Cargo Tunnel and HS2 Euston Enabling Works. He is a chartered civil engineer with an MBA.

VP Finance

Meyrick Evans

Meyrick is a seasoned finance professional qualified as a member of the Institute of Management Accountants (ACMA, CGMA). With a strong background in navigating complex project finance and driving corporate governance,

Meyrick has a proven track record of leading successful turnarounds, implementing process improvements, and spearheading savings initiatives across Europe.

With over 17 years of extensive experience at Airbus(Space Division), he developed a genuine passion for driving Corporate Social Responsibility and promoting the commercialisation of a Green Space Economy.

Scientific Advisors

Sebastian Hennige

Senior Lecturer & expert on Ocean Deacidification

University of Edinburgh
Contributing author to IPCC Special Report & lead editor of UN report on impacts of ocean acidification on biodiversity

Dr. Hennige’s research centers around the impact of climate change and pollutants on marine organisms and ecosystems, with particular focus on tropical and cold-water coral reefs and seagrass meadows. Sebastian studied Marine and Environmental Biology at the University of St. Andrews before taking a PhD at the University of Essex. Following this, he went to the University of Delaware (USA) and Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh (UK) before moving to the University of Edinburgh in 2016. Hennige has spoken at COP 26 and 27 on the impacts of ocean

acidification to vulnerable marine ecosystems, highlighting the role of ‘coralporosis’ in future deep-sea coral reef loss. Hennige has been a contributing author to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC), a contributing author to the 2nd World Ocean Assessment (UNESCO), and lead editor of a United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) report on the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Biodiversity.

Dorothy Peteet

Senior Research Scientist

NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Adjunct Professor
Columbia Climate School Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Dr. Dorothy M. Peteet is a senior research scientist at NASA/Goddard Ins1tute for Space Studies and an Adjunct professor at Columbia University. She directs the Paleoecology Division of the New Core Lab at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia. In collaboration with GISS climate modelers and LDEO geochemists, she is studying conditions of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene that are archived in sediments from lakes and wetlands. Peteet documents past changes in vegetation, derived from analyses of pollen and spores, plant and animal macrofossils, carbon, and charcoal embedded in sediments. Her research provides local

and regional records of ancient vegetational and climate history. One recent focus has been the sequestration of carbon in northern peatland and coastal marshes: ecosystems that are now vulnerable to climate change and poten1ally release significant carbon back into the atmosphere.  Peteet also has performed climate modeling experiments to test hypotheses concerning the last glacial maximum and abrupt climate change. She is interested in climate sensitivity and in how past climate changes and ecological shifts might provide insight on future climate change.

Don Anderson

Senior Scientist

Don Anderson is a Senior Scientist in the Biology Department of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He earned three degrees from MIT – a BS in Mechanical Engineering in 1970, and a MS (1975) and PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 1977.  He joined the scientific staff at WHOI in 1978.  He has received the following awards: the Stanley W. Watson Chair for Excellence in Oceanography (WHOI, 1993), the NOAA Environmental Hero award (1999), the Dr. David L. Belding Award (Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Advisory Commission, 2005), the Yasumoto Lifetime Achievement Award (the International Society for the Study of Harmful Algae , 2006), the Bostwick H. Ketchum Award (2017), and the Lifetime Research and Service Award from the US National Harmful Algal Bloom Committee.  Anderson is the former director of WHOI’s Coastal Ocean Institute (COI), and presently serves as Director of the Cooperative Institute for North Atlantic Research (CINAR). Anderson also serves as Director of the U.S. National Office for Harmful Algal Blooms.

Anderson’s research focus is on toxic or harmful algal blooms (HABs), commonly called “red tides”.  His research ranges from molecular and physiological studies of growth, sexuality, and toxin production to the large-scale oceanography and ecology of the “blooms” of these microorganisms, including numerical modeling, forecasting, and a range of monitoring and management strategies, many reliant on novel instrumentation and biosensors.  Another new areaof researchis on the effects of climate change and global warming on HABs and coastal communities.  Anderson is heavily involved in national and international program development for research, monitoring, and management of red tides, marine biotoxins, and HABs.  He has testified nine times before Congressional committees, and has been actively involved in legislation and appropriations related to HABs and hypoxia. Anderson is the author, co-author, or editor of over 330 scientific papers and 14 books

Sebastian Hennige

Senior Lecturer & expert on Ocean Deacidification

University of Edinburgh
Contributing author to IPCC Special Report & lead editor of UN report on impacts of ocean acidification on biodiversity

Dr. Hennige’s research centers around the impact of climate change and pollutants on marine organisms and ecosystems, with particular focus on tropical and cold-water coral reefs and seagrass meadows. Sebastian studied Marine and Environmental Biology at the University of St. Andrews before taking a PhD at the University of Essex. Following this, he went to the University of Delaware (USA) and Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh (UK) before moving to the University of Edinburgh in 2016. Hennige has spoken at COP 26 and 27 on the impacts of ocean

acidification to vulnerable marine ecosystems, highlighting the role of ‘coralporosis’ in future deep-sea coral reef loss. Hennige has been a contributing author to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC), a contributing author to the 2nd World Ocean Assessment (UNESCO), and lead editor of a United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) report on the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Biodiversity.

Dorothy Peteet

Senior Research Scientist

NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Adjunct Professor
Columbia Climate School Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Dr. Dorothy M. Peteet is a senior research scientist at NASA/Goddard Ins1tute for Space Studies and an Adjunct professor at Columbia University. She directs the Paleoecology Division of the New Core Lab at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia. In collaboration with GISS climate modelers and LDEO geochemists, she is studying conditions of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene that are archived in sediments from lakes and wetlands. Peteet documents past changes in vegetation, derived from analyses of pollen and spores, plant and animal macrofossils, carbon, and charcoal embedded in sediments. Her research provides local

and regional records of ancient vegetational and climate history. One recent focus has been the sequestration of carbon in northern peatland and coastal marshes: ecosystems that are now vulnerable to climate change and poten1ally release significant carbon back into the atmosphere.  Peteet also has performed climate modeling experiments to test hypotheses concerning the last glacial maximum and abrupt climate change. She is interested in climate sensitivity and in how past climate changes and ecological shifts might provide insight on future climate change.

Don Anderson

Senior Scientist

Don Anderson is a Senior Scientist in the Biology Department of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He earned three degrees from MIT – a BS in Mechanical Engineering in 1970, and a MS (1975) and PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 1977.  He joined the scientific staff at WHOI in 1978.  He has received the following awards: the Stanley W. Watson Chair for Excellence in Oceanography (WHOI, 1993), the NOAA Environmental Hero award (1999), the Dr. David L. Belding Award (Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Advisory Commission, 2005), the Yasumoto Lifetime Achievement Award (the International Society for the Study of Harmful Algae , 2006), the Bostwick H. Ketchum Award (2017), and the Lifetime Research and Service Award from the US National Harmful Algal Bloom Committee.  Anderson is the former director of WHOI’s Coastal Ocean Institute (COI), and presently serves as Director of the Cooperative Institute for North Atlantic Research (CINAR). Anderson also serves as Director of the U.S. National Office for Harmful Algal Blooms.

Anderson’s research focus is on toxic or harmful algal blooms (HABs), commonly called “red tides”.  His research ranges from molecular and physiological studies of growth, sexuality, and toxin production to the large-scale oceanography and ecology of the “blooms” of these microorganisms, including numerical modeling, forecasting, and a range of monitoring and management strategies, many reliant on novel instrumentation and biosensors.  Another new areaof researchis on the effects of climate change and global warming on HABs and coastal communities.  Anderson is heavily involved in national and international program development for research, monitoring, and management of red tides, marine biotoxins, and HABs.  He has testified nine times before Congressional committees, and has been actively involved in legislation and appropriations related to HABs and hypoxia. Anderson is the author, co-author, or editor of over 330 scientific papers and 14 books

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